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Political advancement tended to lag behind economic and social development, especially in the south (for the role of the Northern Territories was principally the supply of cheap labour for the Gold Coast and Asante). World War II, to which the Gold Coast contributed many men and materials, accentuated this lag, and in 1948 there were riots of workers and veterans in the larger towns. The Watson Commission of Inquiry reported that the Burns constitution of 1946, which had granted Africans a majority in the legislative council, was “outmoded at birth.” An all-African committee under Justice (later Sir James Henley) Coussey was appointed to work out a new constitution in which some executive power would be transferred to African ministers responsible to an African assembly. Meanwhile, a radical politician, Kwame Nkrumah, had established the Convention People’s Party (CPP), which, with wide popular support, campaigned with strikes and other actions under the slogan “Self-government now.” In 1951 the CPP won almost all the elective seats in the post-Coussey legislative assembly, whereupon Gov. Sir Charles Arden-Clarke invited Nkrumah to lead the new administration. A partnership developed between the two, so power was rapidly transferred to an all-African cabinet responsible to a popularly elected national assembly.Nkrumah saw independent Ghana as a spearhead for the liberation of the rest of Africa from colonial rule and the establishment of a socialist African unity under his leadership. After the founding of a republic in 1960, the state became identified with a single political party (the CPP), with Nkrumah, as life president of both, taking ever more power for himself. On the Pan-African front Nkrumah’s messianism was increasingly challenged by other leaders of an ever-growing number of independent states.

Source: www.britanica.com

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